Corporate International | Los Angeles Conservancy

Corporate International

Photo by Larry Underhill

American Cement Building Lofts

Built to house the American Cement Company's headquarters and to showcase the strength, construction advantages, and architectural possibilities of concrete.
Photo from Tom Gardner Collection/Conservancy archives

CBS Television City

CBS' Television City was one of the first and largest complexes built expressly for television production and broadcasting, and clearly signified L.A.'s intent to become the capital of television broadcasting.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Century Plaza Towers

Yamasaki's design for the Corporate International-style towers reflects his belief that buildings should use the smallest possible amount of materials to attain the greatest possible stability, function, and aesthetic appeal.
Photo by Annie Laskey/Los Angeles Conservancy

City National Plaza

Completed in 1972 for the headquarters of Atlantic Richfield Company, these dark towers flanking a striking plaza typify the corporate architecture of the time.
Gas Company Tower
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Gas Company Tower

The 1991 Gas Company Tower rises in a series of cliff-like setbacks and inverted corners, with an elliptical top of blue glass symbolizing the trademark blue flame of the building’s primary tenant
Harbor Building
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Harbor Building

Combining Corporate International and Late Moderne styles, Claud Beelman's Harbor Building on Wilshire Boulevard is one of the era's most impressive corporate buildings.
Los Angeles Center Studios
Photo courtesy www.you-are-here.com

Los Angeles Center Studios

The highest building in downtown Los Angeles upon its completion in 1958, the tower's successful adaptive reuse in 1998 illustrates the potential for new uses of historic buildings.
Los Angeles County Hall of Records
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Los Angeles County Hall of Records

A rare example of a Neutra high-rise, this T-shaped wonder projects an elegant sense of bureaucratic diligence, monumental in scale.

Pages