1890s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1890s

Photo by Cindy Olnick/L.A. Conservancy

36th Street Apartments

The rehab of this house into transitional housing included local youth, who gained valuable skills and experience.
Photo by Richard Langendorf

Barclay Hotel

The Van Nuys Hotel was one of the finest hotels in Los Angeles upon opening, and the first to provide telephone and electric service to every room.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Bob Mizer Residence and Studio

Photographer Bob Mizer founded one of the first erotic art publications from his studio and home in Pico-Union in the 1940s.
Photo by Douglas Hill/ShootingArchitecture.com

Bradbury Building

Still splendid more than 100 years after its 1893 opening, its magical light-filled Victorian court, open cage elevators, marble stairs, and ornate iron railings make this one of downtown's most photographed icons.
Photo by Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy

El Sereno Middle School

El Sereno Middle School (formerly Wilson High) is notable for both its architectural and cultural significance, including for the role it played in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.
Grand Central Market
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Grand Central Market

In continuous operation as a market since 1917 out of two adjacent buildings built in 1897 and 1905, one of which was the first reinforced concrete building erected in Southern California.
Postcard collection of Los Angeles Conservancy

Griffith Park

Griffith Park is the heart and soul of Los Angeles and in 2009 was designated as an Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) to recognize its significance and ensure its long-term preservation.
Haskins House
Photo by Larry Underhill

Haskins House

The last Victorian built on Carroll Avenue and one of the few "Gay Nineties" houses remaining in Los Angeles, this quintessential Queen Anne vividly illustrates the height of late Victorian exuberance,
Photo by Joshua Targownik

Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles

This flour mill-turned-arts center shows what’s possible in a rapidly changing Arts District.

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