1900s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1900s

Photo courtesy Big Orange Landmarks

Alexandria Hotel

Constructed in 1906 at the then almost unheard of cost of $2 million, the hotel then added a large addition in 1911. The addition included a beautiful banquet hall with a spectacular stained-glass ceiling, now known as the Palm Court.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Angels Flight

One of L.A.'s most enduring landmarks and the "shortest railway in the world" opened in 1901, and the funicular still carries passengers between Hill Street, just steps from Metro's Pershing Square Station, and the top of Bunker Hill.
Photo from Conservancy archives

Banco Popular de Puerto Rico

Built in 1903 and the largest individual investment for an office building in Los Angeles at the time, the building was acquired and renovated in 1976 making it the first major step in revitalizing Spring Street.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Barlow Respiratory Hospital

A twenty-five acre hillside campus with thirty-two separate historic buildings dating from 1902 to 1952, mostly in the Craftsman and Spanish Colonial Revival styles.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Brand Library and Art Center

One of Glendale’s most iconic buildings received a much-needed renovation and seismic upgrade, revitalizing an anchor of the community and exemplifying civic stewardship.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Continental Building

Known as the first skyscraper in downtown L.A., the lavishly decorated 1904 Beaux-Arts style tower remained the city's tallest office building until the late 1950s.
E. A. K. Hackett House
Photo from Conservancy archives

E. A. K. Hackett House

A Southern California Arts and Crafts classic and one of the most architecturally intact residences in the historic Pico-Union neighborhood.
Photo by Marcello Vavala/L.A. Conservancy

Edward A.D. Christopher Residence

Constructed for a local fruit farmer, the Christopher Residence is one of the oldest remaining homes in Studio City.

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