1980s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1980s

Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

6500 Wilshire

Cadillac Fairview hired architects I. M. Pei and the Luckman Partnership to design its flagship building, apparently sparing no expense in either construction or materials.
Photo courtesy you-are-here.com

708 House

Once a one-story house designed by James H. Caughey for the Case Study House program in 1948, remodeled by architect Eric Owen Moss for his family and now an exuberant testament to the lighter side of the Deconstructivist style.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Air and Space Gallery, California Science Center

Architect Frank Gehry's first major public work celebrates California's history in the aviation and aerospace industries with an ingenious use of space and light, an allusion to the challenges of aerospace design.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Al Struckus House

Embodying architect Bruce Goff's philosophy of organic architecture, which held that each design should be as unique as its owner, the building undeniably reflects the architect's "gonzo flair."
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Auto Chek Smog Center

A new industry, minimal marketing budget, and artist as designer yielded a truly unique collection of buildings that are quintessentially Los Angeles.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Binder House

As both owner and occupant, architect Rebecca Binder made her mark on the landscape and also lives with every decision she made.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Bob Mizer Residence and Studio

Photographer Bob Mizer founded one of the first erotic art publications from his studio and home in Pico-Union in the 1940s.
Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Bunker Hill Steps

The ties between downtown L.A. and its Bunker Hill origins have been tenuous at best. The Bunker Hill Steps, built in 1989, aimed to remedy that.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Cabrillo Marine Aquarium

A testament to Frank Gehry's passion for utilitarian material, The Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is dominated by chain link used to create a set of three-dimensional objects extending vertically and obliquely from the center of the complex.

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