Broadway Historic Theatre and Commercial District Walking Tour - 4/14/2018 10:00am | Los Angeles Conservancy

Broadway Historic Theatre and Commercial District Walking Tour - 4/14/2018 10:00am

Saturday, April 14, 2018 -
10:00am to 12:30pm

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ALL SALES FINAL - NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES

Featured Location(s)

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Eastern Columbia Lofts

From its spectacular clock tower emblazoned with the name Eastern in neon down to its multi-colored terrazzo sidewalks, this 1930 downtown landmark was one of the largest buildings constructed in downtown until after WWII.
Tower Theatre photo
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Tower Theatre

The Tower Theater opened in 1927, was the first theatre designed by renowned theatre architect S. Charles Lee. The creative designer was able to fit 900 seats an ground floor retail onto a tiny corner lot.
Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy

Arcade Theatre

The 1910 Pantages Theatre on Broadway was the first in Los Angeles leased to the Pantages Vaudeville Circuit and is one of the oldest remaining theatres in the Broadway Historic Theatre district.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Rialto Theatre

Quinn's Rialto Theatre opened on May 21, 1917. The Rialto was one of the first theatres to have stadium style seating and features the longest neon marquee in the Broadway National Register Historic Theatre District.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Cameo Theatre

Opening in 1910 as Clune's Broadway Theatre to screen first-run films, the 900-seat theatre was one of the country’s first theatres built to show movies. The modest Neo-classical design was considered quite elegant for a movie theatre at the time.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Globe Theatre/Garland Building

Built as a combination office tower and theatre venue, the 1913 Beaux Arts-style Garland Building was designed by Morgan, Walls & Morgan. Built for full-scale live theatre productions, the interior was designed by Alfred F. Rosenheim.
Photo courtesy of Berger/Conser Photography

Los Angeles Theatre

The most lavish and last built of Broadway’s great movie palaces, the 1931 Los Angeles was designed by legendary theatre architect S. Charles Lee.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/Los Angeles Conservancy

Palace Theatre

The Palace opened in 1911 as the third home of the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest theatres in Los Angeles and the oldest remaining original Orpheum theatre in the U.S.
Photo by Annie Laskey/Los Angeles Conservancy

State Theatre and Building

The State Theatre (1921) designed by Weeks & Day is a twelve-story Beaux Art style structure with a brick façade – one of the largest brick-clad buildings in the city – with terra cotta ornamentation at the lower levels.
Photo by Michael Locke

Roxie Theatre

The 1931 Roxie Theatre was the last theatre built on Broadway. The Roxie, noted for its stepped roofline, tower, decorative chevrons, and highly stylized geometric forms, was the only theatre downtown built in the Art Deco architectural style.