Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Broadway Historic Theatre and Commercial District Walking Tour

Broadway Historic Theatre and Commercial District Walking Tour

E.g., 2014-04-20
E.g., 2014-04-20
Saturday, April 26, 2014 - 10:00am Register
Saturday, May 3, 2014 - 10:00am Register
Saturday, May 10, 2014 - 10:00am Register
Saturday, May 17, 2014 - 10:00am Register

Once the entertainment epicenter of Los Angeles, Broadway was home to dozens of major retail and clothing stores, as well as twelve movie palaces built between 1910 and 1931.

Although the theatres no longer regularly show films (special event venue, filming location, and retail are among the current uses), their elegant presence remains.

Still a vibrant shopping street, the area is also a hub of adaptive reuse projects that have turned office buildings and department stores into loft-style apartments and condos.

Subject to availabilty, the tour visits the interior of either the Los Angeles Theatre or the Palace Theatre, and (if available) the Orpheum Theatre. Also included are interiors of other historic commerical buildings, including The Chocolate Shop.

Note: If the Register button does not appear next to a date above, the tour has sold out.

Meeting Location: Reservations are required for this tour. Meeting and parking information will be provided with your reservation confirmation.

Important Policies:

  • Tour will run rain or shine
  • No refunds.  You can change your reservation date if you contact us at info@laconservancy.org at least 24 hours before your original reservation date.
  • No pets.
  • This tour not recommended for young children.
  • Strollers not recommended.
  • If a member of your party is in a wheelchair, please let us know in advance by emailing alaskey@laconservancy.org.

Sample Tour Sites (subject to change)

Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy

Arcade Theatre

The 1910 Pantages Theatre on Broadway was the first in Los Angeles leased to the Pantages Vaudeville Circuit and is one of the oldest remaining theatres in the Broadway Historic Theatre district.
Roxie Theatre photo
Photo by Michael Locke

Roxie Theatre

The 1931 Roxie Theatre was the last theatre built on Broadway. The Roxie, noted for its stepped roofline, tower, decorative chevrons, and highly stylized geometric forms, was the only theatre downtown built in the Art Deco architectural style.
Photo by Trudi Sandmeier

Cameo Theatre

Opening in 1910 as Clune's Broadway Theatre to screen first-run films, the 900-seat theatre was one of the country’s first theatres built to show movies. The modest Neo-classical design was considered quite elegant for a movie theatre at the time.
Palace Theatre photo
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/Los Angeles Conservancy

Palace Theatre

The Palace opened in 1911 as the third home of the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest theatres in Los Angeles and the oldest remaining original Orpheum theatre in the U.S.
Rialto Theatre
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Rialto Theatre

Quinn's Rialto Theatre opened on May 21, 1917. The Rialto was one of the first theatres to have stadium style seating and features the longest neon marquee in the Broadway National Register Historic Theatre District.
State Theatre photo
Photo by Annie Laskey/Los Angeles Conservancy

State Theatre and Building

The State Theatre (1921) designed by Weeks & Day is a twelve-story Beaux Art style structure with a brick façade – one of the largest brick-clad buildings in the city – with terra cotta ornamentation at the lower levels.
Globe Theatre photo
Photo by Annie Laskey/Los Angeles Conservancy

Globe Theatre/Garland Building

Built as a combination office tower and theatre venue, the 1913 Beaux Arts-style Garland Building was designed by Morgan, Walls & Morgan. Built for full-scale live theatre productions, the interior was designed by Alfred F. Rosenheim.
Photo courtesy of Berger/Conser Photography

Los Angeles Theatre

The most lavish and last built of Broadway’s great movie palaces, the 1931 Los Angeles was designed by legendary theatre architect S. Charles Lee.
Tower Theatre photo
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Tower Theatre

The Tower Theater opened in 1927, was the first theatre designed by renowned theatre architect S. Charles Lee. The creative designer was able to fit 900 seats an ground floor retail onto a tiny corner lot.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Eastern Columbia Lofts

From its spectacular clock tower emblazoned with the name Eastern in neon down to its multi-colored terrazzo sidewalks, this 1930 downtown landmark was one of the largest buildings constructed in downtown until after WWII.