Explore 1970s Los Angeles | Los Angeles Conservancy
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Use this map to explore the built environment of the 1970s.

Please note: Although some places on this map have been advocacy issues for the Conservancy, there is no direct correlation between the map and our advocacy activities. Just because a place is, or isn't, on this map does not mean that it will, or won't, be an advocacy issue for the Conservancy at some point. The map is strictly a way to highlight some of the many important buildings relating to the 1970s.

Similarly, this map represents a cross-section of important places built in the 1970s, and new content will be added over time. Do you know of a place that should be included? Let us know!

To start exploring, click anywhere on the map or use the search and filter fields right below it. Your results will appear below this text.

Or, browse through the buildings listed below, in no particular order.

Photo by L.A. Conservancy

Phoenix Bakery

Phoenix Bakery founder F.C. Chan: "No matter what, there is always a need for sweets."
Photo by Carley Hildebrand / L.A. Conservancy

Book Soup

"Bookseller to the Great and Infamous" is Book Soup's tagline: an appropriate description for this Sunset Strip staple.
The Kettle in 2019. Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy.

The Kettle

Opened in 1973, The Kettle was the first twenty-four hour restaurant in Manhattan Beach, and is now one of the few remaining in the South Bay.
Photo by Tom Pellicer Photographer

Glendale Central Library

A rehabilitation project embraced a 1973 Brutalist design, adapting it to meet the changing nature of libraries while respecting and reviving its historic character.
Courtesy GPA Consulting, Inc

Brown Beret Headquarters

This modest building served as one of the organization's most significant headquarters.
Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Ralphs Market

The front façade of this market building by R. Leon Edgar features a combined roof and walls of smooth concrete, bending up from the ground to flatten out and shelter the building.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Security Pacific National Bank

The Security Pacific National Bank building by Jim Tyler of Craig Elwood Associates embodies the Corporate International style with a reinforced concrete frame clad in bronze anodized aluminum and curtain walls of bronze-tinted glass.

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