Explore the Eastside | Los Angeles Conservancy
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Search by address, community or intersection.

Use this map to explore the vibrant heritage of the Eastside, firsthand or online.

Please note: Although some places on this map have been advocacy issues for the Conservancy, there is no direct correlation between the map and our advocacy activities. Just because a place is, or isn't, on this map does not mean that it will, or won't, be an advocacy issue for the Conservancy at some point. The map is strictly a way to highlight some of the many cultural gems in the Eastside.

Similarly, this map represents a cross section of important places in the Eastside, and new content will be added over time. Do you know of a place that should be included? Let us know!

To start exploring, click anywhere on the map or use the search and filter fields right below it. Your results will appear below this text.

Or, browse through the buildings listed below, in no particular order.

As shown by the diversity of these communities over time, the Eastside is home to a range of places with rooted historical, cultural, and architectural significance.

While many historic sites have been preserved and continue to offer vital community services, others have been threatened by development, lack of funding, disrepair, and other factors. In some instances, the Eastside raises important and often difficult questions about the types of places that should be preserved, particularly sites with sensitive, even painful, histories. Nonetheless, these places play an essential role in the life and storytelling of the Eastside, connecting today’s communities with a deeply textured past.

Ethel Percy Andrus Theatre at Lincoln High School. Photo by Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy

Lincoln High School

Lincoln High played a key role in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.
Photo by Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy

El Sereno Middle School

El Sereno Middle School (formerly Wilson High) is notable for both its architectural and cultural significance, including for the role it played in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.
Student Walkouts at Garfield High School. Photo by LAPL.

Garfield High School

The century-old Garfield High School played a key role in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Roosevelt High School

Located in Boyle Heights, Roosevelt High School played a key role in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.

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