CBS Television City | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

CBS Television City

On March 1, the Cultural Heritage Commission (CHC) voted unanimously to take the Conservancy's nomination for CBS Television City under consideration. This is the first step in the process and expect the nomination to go back to the CHC sometime in April for a second vote. We are working closely with representatives of CBS and plan to amend the nomination to add greater specificity to clearly delineate the character-defining features of CBS Television City. 

In December 2017, the Conservancy submitted a nomination to designate the storied CBS Television City complex as a Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) following news in September that CBS Corporation was potentially interested in marketing the 25-acre property. Announcement of a potential sale has raised widespread concern over the fate of the architecturally and culturally significant campus, which was identified as National Register-eligible in Los Angeles’ SurveyLA.

Landmark designation will offer protection to the property by requiring preservation design review and approval through the city’s Office of Historic Resources to guide any redevelopment and adaptive reuse of the campus, including new infill construction. 

 

Opened in 1952 at the southeast corner of Beverly Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue, CBS Television City is the first large-scale facility designed specifically for television production in the United States. CBS hired the local architecture firm Pereira & Luckman, with Gin Wong serving as lead designer, to design its new headquarters, which contained soundstages, studios, editing rooms, offices, rehearsal halls, shops, and storage. On the interior, flexibility was key: studio walls, and even some exterior walls, could be moved and rearranged to accommodate the needs of specific productions.

For more than six decades and counting it has been the portal by which some of America’s most beloved television shows have been produced. From within its modern and custom-designed stages, television broke new ground, from  variety/sketch comedy television shows like The Carol Burnett Show to the life of Archie Bunker and the controversial issues of the day in All in the Family.

In December 2017, the Conservancy submitted the nomination to designate CBS Television City as a Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) following news in September that CBS Corporation was potentially interested in marketing the 25-acre property. A historic property is often at risk when it changes out of long-time stewardship.

Contact Councilmember David Ryu and ask for his support of the Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) nomination for CBS Television City, cd4.issues@lacity.org.

Copy us so that we can track outreach and any email correspondence at afine@laconservancy.org.