James K. Hill and Sons Pickle Works Building | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

James K. Hill and Sons Pickle Works Building

The Pickle Works Building was built in 1888 for the California Vinegar & Pickle Company, later known as the James K. Hill & Sons Company. As with many industrial structures, the building was expanded over time, in several phases, until around 1909. The additions used the same structural wood frame system with brick masonry walls and matching design details. 

A variety of tenants have occupied various portions of the building throughout its history. In the 1980s and ’90s, it was known as the Citizens Warehouse and Art Dock, housing contemporary artists.

In 2005, the Pickle Works Building was determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places as a rare, surviving example of a Victorian-era brick industrial building.

Photo by Douglas Hill

Albert Van Luit Complex

The site of the world-renowned wallpaper factory of Albert Van Luit, the Mid-Century Modern Van Luit Complex provided a safe and diverse work environment for ethnic and sexual minorities from the 1950s through 1970s.
Heim House
Photo from Conservancy archives

Heim House

One of the original Victorian-era homes built during the initial development of the Angelino Heights neighborhood, it is one of three easements held by the Conservancy on Carroll Avenue.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Southwest Marine (Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Southwestern Shipbuilding)

Southwest Marine is the last remaining example of the once highly significant shipbuilding industry at the Port of Los Angeles, remarkably intact and dating to World War II, with sixteen buildings and structures considered contributing elements of a National Register-eligible historic district.