Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) | Los Angeles Conservancy
Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

When it opened in 1965, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) was the largest new art museum the country had seen in a quarter century. The museum rose on the site of the old adobe and tree-shaded home ranch that the Hancock family donated to the county for a park in 1916. Three original LACMA buildings faced onto Wilshire from a raised plaza, with fountains and a reflecting pool along the boulevard. The original complex included the four-story Ahmanson Gallery housing the permanent collection, the Lytton Gallery with changing exhibitions, and the Leo S. Bing Center with a 600-seat auditorium.

A decade after its opening, the museum's water features were filled in and replaced with a sculpture garden, partly out of concern over oil and gas seepage. In the 1980s, a major renovation radically altered the museum's presence on Wilshire Boulevard. The Robert O. Anderson wing, housing LACMA's twentieth-century art collection, now fronts Wilshire with a wall of glazed limestone and glass block. 

Photo courtesy El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument

América Tropical

This monumental mural by acclaimed artist and muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros was deemed too controversial and was whitewashed within a few short years of its unveiling.
Car Wash
Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Car Wash

Originally known as the Auto Laundry, this Googie-style Ventura Boulevard gem is one of few that retains its spectacular original details that unmistakably advertise it as a car wash.
Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Cafetales

One of the finest of Inglewood's storied Mid-Century Modern classics and a stellar example of playful Googie-style coffee shops.