Lou Ehlers Cadillac (Demolished) | Los Angeles Conservancy
Lou Ehlers Cadillac
Photo by Larry Underhill

Lou Ehlers Cadillac (Demolished)

Opened in 1955, the Lou Ehlers showroom was designed by the noted firm of Stiles O. Clements & Associates. Floor-to-ceiling plate glass windows gave passing motorists and pedestrians unobstructed views of the showroom floor, while the use of Cadillac's logo for immense script signage on the building's exterior attracted customers from afar. The building was one of the three most significant postwar auto showrooms remaining in Los Angeles, along with Casa de Cadillac in Sherman Oaks and Felix Chevrolet near the University of Southern California's University Park campus. Despite intensive advocacy efforts to save it, the dealership was demolished in 2008.

Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Reynolds Buick

Designed by William Garwood, the dealership features concrete block façades dominated by the showroom, a protruding volume of floor-to-ceiling glass windows. An overhanging steel roof supported by exaggerated, almost Googie-style trusses shelters the whole building in style.
Photo by Douglas Hill

Albert Van Luit Complex

The site of the world-renowned wallpaper factory of Albert Van Luit, the Mid-Century Modern Van Luit Complex provided a safe and diverse work environment for ethnic and sexual minorities from the 1950s through 1970s.
Photo by Michael Locke

Kubly House

Sitting in an old eucalyptus grove, the giant trees providing privacy for the transparent house, this post-and-beam residence is a spare, horizontal box that is lifted pavilion-like off the ground.