Union Bank Building | Los Angeles Conservancy

Union Bank Building

The Union Bank Building was the first high-rise built in the Central Business District after the 1920s. It was one of the first skyscrapers erected after the 150’ height limit was repealed in 1957 and the first building taller than City Hall. It was also the first structure to be completed as part of the Bunker Hill redevelopment project that began an era of skyscraper building in the Central Business District.

As the first structure completed as part of the Bunker Hill redevelopment project, the Union Bank Building was an important step in making the area attractive to new development. The developers were the Connecticut General Life Insurance Company, which purchased the land in 1965. Placed on a sloped site, the forty-story tower rises uninterrupted from a plaza, which itself is set back above a two-story retail court which is at street level. The tower’s recessed windows are heavily framed with a grid of concrete panels. The effect of the panels is to give the building the sense of a monolithic skyscraper from a distance, but close up it looks as if a net or cage of concrete has been lowered over a glass tower.

To the north is a garden plaza designed by important modernist architect Garret Eckbo of Eckbo, Dean, Austin, and Williams).

Photo by Marisela Ramirez/L.A. Conservancy

El Mercado

El Mercado, often known as "El Mercadito" to locals, embodies the traditional Mexican cultural identity of the Eastside.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Century Plaza Towers

Yamasaki's design for the Corporate International-style towers reflects his belief that buildings should use the smallest possible amount of materials to attain the greatest possible stability, function, and aesthetic appeal.