Vernacular | Los Angeles Conservancy

Vernacular

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery

The Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery was the most modern, state-of-the-art facility on Terminal Island, today a highly rare, intact site that exemplifies the postwar expansion of canneries in the Fish Harbor area.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Paramount Pictures

Paramount Pictures reveals the evolution of Hollywood film studios in the twentieth century and is home to a rich collection of historic buildings.
2218 E. First St., formerly home to Redz. Photo by Manuel Huerta/L.A. Conservancy

Redz (Former)

One of the few lesbian bars to cater to Latinas opened in Boyle Heights in the 1950s.
Photo by Marisela Ramirez/L.A. Conservancy

Silver Dollar Bar and Café

The death of Ruben Salazar at the Silver Dollar marked a turning point in the Chicano civil rights movement.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Southwest Marine (Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Southwestern Shipbuilding)

Southwest Marine is the last remaining example of the once highly significant shipbuilding industry at the Port of Los Angeles, remarkably intact and dating to World War II, with sixteen buildings and structures considered contributing elements of a National Register-eligible historic district.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Star-Kist Tuna Cannery Main Plant

The familiar Star-Kist Company traces its origins to 1918 on Terminal Island and by 1952 held the distinction of being the single-largest cannery in the world.

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