1910s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1910s

Photo from Conservancy archives

Eugene W. Britt House

Reflecting the fine luxury homes of turn-of-the-century L.A., most of the fixtures and materials in the Britt House were imported, including Italian marble.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Globe Theatre/Garland Building

Built as a combination office tower and theatre venue, the 1913 Beaux Arts-style Garland Building was designed by Morgan, Walls & Morgan. Built for full-scale live theatre productions, the interior was designed by Alfred F. Rosenheim.
Photo courtesy Big Orange Landmarks

Herald-Examiner Building

Julia Morgan, the first licensed female architect in California, designed this Mission Revival style building to house the operations of William Randolph Hearst's newspaper, the Los Angeles Examiner.
Photo courtesy Heritage Housing Partners

Herkimer Arms

Built in 1912 as an eight-unit dwelling, the Herkimer Arms is the only surviving apartment building by master architects Charles and Henry Greene, and one of their few buildings with a gunite exterior.
Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy staff.

Japanese American Commercial Village Buildings

This row of modest commercial buildings is the last vestige of a Japanese fishing village and commercial district that thrived on Terminal Island before World War II.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Japanese Hospital

Established during an era of discriminatory medical practices, the Japanese Hospital opened its doors to a diverse clientele in the wake of a landmark case before the U.S. Supreme Court.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

LAFD Fire Engine Company No. 30

The first of two all-black fire stations in Los Angeles, Fire Company No. 30 played a key role in securing workplace equality for African American firefighters.

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