1910s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1910s

Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist, 2018. M. Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy
Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist, 2018. Photo by M. Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy

Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist

The Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist and Pole Sign is Historic-Cultural Monument #1198. The property is significant for its association with the Sakai-Kozawa family and their longtime floral business, Tokio Florist, which operated at this location from 1960 to 2006.
Photo by Richard Langendorf

San Fernando Building

The 1907 San Fernando Building was developed by James B. Lankershim, one of California’s largest landholders. In 2000, the building was the first adaptive reuse housing project developed by Gilmore Associates as part of the creation of the Old Bank District.
Santa Fe Art Colony
1916 building that originally housed the C.B. Van Vorst Company, now known as the Santa Fe Art Colony

Santa Fe Art Colony

Originally built to house the operations of C.B. Van Vorst Furniture Manufacturing Company, since 1988 it has been home to live/work artists as the Santa Fe Art Colony. In June 2019, the Conservancy nominated the building for local Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) recognition.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Southwest Marine (Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Southwestern Shipbuilding)

Southwest Marine is the last remaining example of the once highly significant shipbuilding industry at the Port of Los Angeles, remarkably intact and dating to World War II, with sixteen buildings and structures considered contributing elements of a National Register-eligible historic district.
Photo by Mike Hume

The Woman's Building

Established in 1973, The Woman's Building fostered experimental lesbian and feminist art for nearly twenty years.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Tom of Finland House

Artist Tom of Finland played an important role in changing public perceptions of erotic art in Los Angeles.

Pages