1930s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1930s

Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Samuel-Novarro Residence

During the 1930s, gay silent film star Ramon Novarro lived in this dramatic Lloyd Wright-designed hillside residence.
Photo from L.A. Conservancy archives

Santa Anita Park

Santa Anita Park greatly contributed to the advancement of California's thoroughbred racing industry, though it would later become infamous as the site of the largest Assembly Center for Japanese American internment during World War II.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Shepherd Residence

Architect William J. Gage's design for the 1938 Shepherd Residence remarkably blends the Neoclassical style with Regency Revival style architecture.
Photo by Kevin Break

Sixth Street Viaduct

Built in 1932, the two-thirds-mile-long Sixth Street Viaduct is the last-built and grandest of the monumental river bridges, with its graceful steel arches and Classical Moderne design.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Southwest Marine (Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Southwestern Shipbuilding)

Southwest Marine is the last remaining example of the once highly significant shipbuilding industry at the Port of Los Angeles, remarkably intact and dating to World War II, with sixteen buildings and structures considered contributing elements of a National Register-eligible historic district.
The Black Cat, 2013. Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

The Black Cat

The site of a 1966 police raid, The Black Cat represents the early evolution of the LGBTQ civil rights movement.

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