1940s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1940s

Case Study House #1
Photo by Larry Underhill

Case Study House #1

Case Study House #1 introduced architectural elements that came to characterize the Case Study House program, including floor to ceiling glass, a flat roof, and an open floor plan.
Photo by Regina O'Brien

Case Study House #10

Case Study House #10 exemplified the Case Study House program goals through the use of new building materials and techniques, affordability for the average American, simplicity of construction, economy of materials, and integration of indoor and outdoor living.
Photo courtesy the Kor Group

Chase Knolls

This garden apartment community in Sherman Oaks was built in response to the postwar population boom, for those looking for "gracious living in apartment homes."
Chez Jay photo
Photo courtesy Jay Fiondella Family Trust

Chez Jay

A nautical-themed steak house and bar with room for only about ten tables opened in 1959.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Chicken of the Sea Cannery

Known as Van Camp Seafood Company from 1914 through 1997, the Chicken of the Sea Cannery helped transform the tuna industry, and is Terminal Island’s longest-operating cannery.
Eames House and Studio (Case Study House #8)
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Eames House and Studio (Case Study House #8)

One of the most famous Mid-Century Modern buildings in Los Angeles, designed by its owners, legendary designers Charles and Ray Eames, as two simple boxes that reflect the Eames' love of industrial design and materials.
Earl Carroll Theatre, now Nickelodeon Studios. Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Earl Carroll Theatre

Designed by master architect Gordon B. Kaufmann, the Earl Carroll Theatre exemplifies the optimism and grandeur of pre-war Hollywood.
Ennis House
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Ennis House

The last and largest of Frank Lloyd Wright’s four “textile block” houses was designed by the father and built by the famed architect's son Lloyd.

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