In National Historic District | Los Angeles Conservancy

In National Historic District

Photo by Flora Chou/L.A. Conservancy

Milner Road Residence

Clad in textured stucco and featuring a tiled roof, wrought-iron hardware and grille work, this three-story residence exemplifies the Mediterranean style.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Ninth and Broadway Building

Visitors stepping into Claud Beelman's 1930 Ninth and Broadway Building are treated to a dramatic two-story entrance, recessed with heavy piers capped by a segmented arch.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/Los Angeles Conservancy

Palace Theatre

The Palace opened in 1911 as the third home of the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest theatres in Los Angeles and the oldest remaining original Orpheum theatre in the U.S.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Pantages Theatre

The 1930 Pantages Theatre can hold claim to two “lasts”: the last movie palace to be built in Hollywood and the last venue erected by vaudeville circuit owner, Alexander Pantages. Designed by B. Marcus Priteca at the epitome of the Art Deco era, from sidewalk to stage, the Pantages dazzles theater-goers with chevrons, zigzags, starbrusts, and exotic figures.
Photo by Juan Kenobi

Pasadena Playhouse

Opened in 1925, the Pasadena Community Playhouse was designed by Elmer Grey and built by the Winter Construction Co. As the new home of the Pasadena Community Theatre, the Playhouse quickly became a hub of the theatre community west of the Mississippi River.
Perkins House
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Perkins House

A house designed for art history professor Constance Perkins' to reflect her personal living style: art-loving, landscape-focused, creative, and independent.
Photo by Marco Antonio Garcia

Phillips House

One of the most ornate homes in Angelino Heights, this 1887 house on a prominent corner lot feature extravagant decoration all sides.
Photo by Annie Laskey/Los Angeles Conservancy

Pinney House

Built for industrialist Henry Pinney and occupied by his son until 1980, this home features fish-scale shingles, intricate fretwork, and enclosed eaves with decorative brackets, which were typical of the period.

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