In National Historic District | Los Angeles Conservancy

In National Historic District

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Rialto Theatre

Quinn's Rialto Theatre opened on May 21, 1917. The Rialto was one of the first theatres to have stadium style seating and features the longest neon marquee in the Broadway National Register Historic Theatre District.
Photo by Michael Locke

Roxie Theatre

The 1931 Roxie Theatre was the last theatre built on Broadway. The Roxie, noted for its stepped roofline, tower, decorative chevrons, and highly stylized geometric forms, was the only theatre downtown built in the Art Deco architectural style.
Photo by Marco Antonio Garcia

Scheerer House

This small Queen Anne-style cottage is a 'plan book" house, build from a kit ordered from a catalog. Though modest, it has many of the same decorative touches as its neighbors.
Photo by Annie Laskey

Sessions House

This remarkable home was designed by architect Joseph Cather Newsom. Built in 1889, it features complex textures and shapes, as well as a pair of carved bearded dogs guarding the front steps.
Photo by Annie Laskey/Los Angeles Conservancy

State Theatre and Building

The State Theatre (1921) designed by Weeks & Day is a twelve-story Beaux Art style structure with a brick façade – one of the largest brick-clad buildings in the city – with terra cotta ornamentation at the lower levels.
The Doumakes House
Photo courtesy deasy/penner&partners

The Doumakes House

The Doumakes House was the first site to be landmarked after L.A. County's preservation program took effect.
Tower Theatre photo
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Tower Theatre

The Tower Theater opened in 1927, was the first theatre designed by renowned theatre architect S. Charles Lee. The creative designer was able to fit 900 seats an ground floor retail onto a tiny corner lot.
Photo by Larry Underhill

Wadsworth Chapel

The oldest remaining building on Wilshire served Protestants on one side and Catholics on the other.

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