Private Residence - Do Not Disturb | Los Angeles Conservancy

Private Residence - Do Not Disturb

Eames House and Studio (Case Study House #8)
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Eames House and Studio (Case Study House #8)

One of the most famous Mid-Century Modern buildings in Los Angeles, designed by its owners, legendary designers Charles and Ray Eames, as two simple boxes that reflect the Eames' love of industrial design and materials.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Eastern Columbia Lofts

From its spectacular clock tower emblazoned with the name Eastern in neon down to its multi-colored terrazzo sidewalks, this 1930 downtown landmark was one of the largest buildings constructed in downtown until after WWII.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Edinburgh Bungalow Court

Completed in 1923, the Edinburgh Bungalow Court reflects early settlement patterns and the rise of the entertainment industry in Los Angeles.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Elmer Belt Residence

Dr. Elmer Belt pioneered sex reassignment procedures in the 1950s and played a key role in redefining gender and sexual identities.
Ennis House
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Ennis House

The last and largest of Frank Lloyd Wright’s four “textile block” houses was designed by the father and built by the famed architect's son Lloyd.
Photo by Bruce Scottow/L.A. Conservancy

Evelyn Hooker Residence

Dr. Hooker's groundbreaking psychological studies of gay men helped change the commonly held belief that homosexuality was a mental illness.
Familian House
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Familian House

In the Familian House, the celebrated architect—delicately manipulating dramatic contradictions between outside and in, light and dark, modern and ancient—created a masterpiece.

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