Air and Space Gallery, California Science Center | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Air and Space Gallery, California Science Center

The California Aerospace Museum was internationally acclaimed architect Frank Gehry’s first major public work. Completed in 1984, the museum is a celebration of California’s history as a leader in the aviation and aerospace industries. It was originally conceived as a giant, hangar-like space. By cantilevering and sloping the walls, Gehry increased the museum’s volume and exhibition space on its narrow site hugging the south façade of a 1913 brick armory. The ingenious use of space and light can be seen as an allusion to the challenges of aerospace design, which also requires the maximum use of a small area and the creation of numerous viewing perspectives.

The California Aerospace Museum is the first large-scale realization of the idea of the "frozen explosion," created though geometric and distinct exterior shapes, which would become one of Gehry’s signature design elements.

The east side of the building is stucco, upright, and rectangular. Pulling away from it is the west side’s angular, seven-sided polygon with street metal cladding. Further emphasizing the idea of frozen blast, a Lockheed F-104 Starfighter jet is suspended in takeoff, angled upwards from the south wall. The late 1950s fighter jet, a product of California aviation leader Lockheed Aircraft Company (founded in Hollywood in 1926), serves as the building’s signage. Following the museum’s completion, Gehry received commissions for high-profile museum and public projects all over the world.

Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist, 2018. M. Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy
Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist, 2018. Photo by M. Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy

Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist

This rare and highly intact example of a Tudor Craftsman residence was constructed in the 1910s. The home and grounds are significant for their association with the Sakai-Kozawa family and their longtime floral business in Los Angeles, which operated at this location from 1962 to 2006.
Front facade, as seen in recent real estate promotional materials, Essex and Harvey, Coldwell Banker Previews International

Singleton Estate

Designed in the French Revival style, the 1970 Singleton Estate represents the combined creative visions of masters Wallace Neff, Thomas Church, and Philip Shipley.