Industrial | Los Angeles Conservancy

Industrial

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery

The Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery was the most modern, state-of-the-art facility on Terminal Island, today a highly rare, intact site that exemplifies the postwar expansion of canneries in the Fish Harbor area.
Santa Fe Art Colony
1916 building that originally housed the C.B. Van Vorst Company, now known as the Santa Fe Art Colony

Santa Fe Art Colony

Originally built to house the operations of C.B. Van Vorst Furniture Manufacturing Company, since 1988 it has been home to live/work artists as the Santa Fe Art Colony. In June 2019, the Conservancy nominated the building for local Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) recognition.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Southwest Marine (Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Southwestern Shipbuilding)

Southwest Marine is the last remaining example of the once highly significant shipbuilding industry at the Port of Los Angeles, remarkably intact and dating to World War II, with sixteen buildings and structures considered contributing elements of a National Register-eligible historic district.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Star-Kist Tuna Cannery Main Plant

The familiar Star-Kist Company traces its origins to 1918 on Terminal Island and by 1952 held the distinction of being the single-largest cannery in the world.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine / L.A. Conservancy

The Factory

The 1929 Factory building embodies a number of significant historical patterns in West Hollywood, from the development of the entertainment industry to the rise of nightlife visibly catering to the gay community.
Photo by Mike Hume

The Woman's Building

Established in 1973, The Woman's Building fostered experimental lesbian and feminist art for nearly twenty years.

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