Residential (All) | Los Angeles Conservancy

Residential (All)

Downtown Women’s Center
Photo by Randall Michelson, Courtesy Pica + Sullivan Architects, Ltd.

Downtown Women’s Center

After years of languishing, what William Douglas Lee had designed for a shoe company gained new life as the Downtown Women's Center, earning a Conservancy Preservation Award.
Photo courtesy Thomas Safran & Associates and Coalition for Responsible Community Development

Dunbar Hotel

A beloved landmark of L.A.'s African American heritage has reclaimed its rightful place as a vibrant community resource.
E. A. K. Hackett House
Photo from Conservancy archives

E. A. K. Hackett House

A Southern California Arts and Crafts classic and one of the most architecturally intact residences in the historic Pico-Union neighborhood.
Eames House and Studio (Case Study House #8)
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Eames House and Studio (Case Study House #8)

One of the most famous Mid-Century Modern buildings in Los Angeles, designed by its owners, legendary designers Charles and Ray Eames, as two simple boxes that reflect the Eames' love of industrial design and materials.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Edinburgh Bungalow Court

Completed in 1923, the Edinburgh Bungalow Court reflects early settlement patterns and the rise of the entertainment industry in Los Angeles.
Photo by Marcello Vavala/L.A. Conservancy

Edward A.D. Christopher Residence

Constructed for a local fruit farmer, the Christopher Residence is one of the oldest remaining homes in Studio City.
Eldridge House
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Eldridge House

An elegant example of Claremont Modernism, the Eldridge House was a clear outcropping of the architect's abiding principle of "total environment."
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Elmer Belt Residence

Dr. Elmer Belt pioneered sex reassignment procedures in the 1950s and played a key role in redefining gender and sexual identities.
Ennis House
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Ennis House

The last and largest of Frank Lloyd Wright’s four “textile block” houses was designed by the father and built by the famed architect's son Lloyd.

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