1950s | Los Angeles Conservancy

1950s

Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Phineas Kappe Residence

Completed in 1956, the Phineas Kappe Residence represents one of the architect’s earliest designs, but it exhibits all the trademarks for which he would become known: post-and-beam construction, an open interior plan, patio spaces and expanses of glass to bring the outside inside, and a focus on the details of craftsmanship and materials.
Photo by Sarah Locke

Rancho Estates

Of the many tract housing developments Cliff May designed in the 1950s, the largest (and one of the highest-praised) was Lakewood Rancho Estates in Long Beach.
Photo by Michael Locke

Randy's Donuts

Randy’s Donuts is one of Los Angeles’ most iconic landmarks and represents the postwar optimism and whimsy of the city in a way few other places can.
Target
Photo by Tom Davies

Robinson’s/Target

Designed for the affluent postwar Pasadena shopper, this former Robinson's was planned and sited to include prime viewing spots for the Rose Parade.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Saga Motor Hotel

Local architect Harold Zook designed the Saga to catch the eye of the passing motorist, with a dramatic neon sign in Moorish-inspired script, intricately decorated concrete block elements, and towering palm trees around the glistening swimming pool.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Sepulveda Rose

This understated post-and-beam apartment complex is a very graceful application of the Mid-Century Modern post-and-beam idiom to a large-scale building, and deserves notice among Dorman’s higher-profile works.

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