Explore LGBTQ Los Angeles | Los Angeles Conservancy
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Use this map to explore historic places important to our LGBTQ heritage.

Please note: Although some places on this map have been advocacy issues for the Conservancy, there is no direct correlation between the map and our advocacy activities. 

Just because a place is, or isn't, on this map does not mean that it will, or won't, be an advocacy issue for the Conservancy at some point. 

Similarly, this map represents a cross-section of LGBTQ historic places in Los Angeles County and is not an exhaustive list of places that are important in the history of the LGBTQ community. As more information is uncovered, new content will be added over time. Do you know of a place that should be included? Let us know!

To start exploring, click anywhere on the map or use the search and filter fields right below it. Your results will appear below this text.

Or, browse through the buildings listed below, in no particular order.

Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Elmer Belt Residence

Dr. Elmer Belt pioneered sex reassignment procedures in the 1950s and played a key role in redefining gender and sexual identities.
Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Liberation House

The original Liberation House in Hollywood represented a response to the increasing numbers of LGBTQ individuals living on the streets in the 1970s.
Photo by Trudi Sandmeier

Highways Performance Space

Highways Performance Space provided artists and activists with a collaborative space at the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Beth Chayim Chadashim

Beth Chayim Chadashim was the first LGBTQ synagogue in the world.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Daughters of Bilitis

The L.A. chapter of the Daughters of Bilitis was responsible for bringing greater visibility to the experiences of lesbians during the 1950s and '60s.
Photo by Mike Hume

The Woman's Building

Established in 1973, The Woman's Building fostered experimental lesbian and feminist art for nearly twenty years.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Morris Kight Residence

Activist Morris Kight co-founded a number of influential LGBTQ civil rights organizations, including the Gay Liberation Front.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Merced Theatre

Known for its masked balls at the turn of the twentieth century, the Merced Theatre is one of the oldest remaining LGBTQ spaces in Los Angeles.
Photo by Bruce Scottow/L.A. Conservancy

Evelyn Hooker Residence

Dr. Hooker's groundbreaking psychological studies of gay men helped change the commonly held belief that homosexuality was a mental illness.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Hattie McDaniel Residence

Sugar Hill resident Hattie McDaniel, who identified as a bisexual woman, was the first African American to win an Academy Award.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Margaret and Harry Hay Residence

Designed by modernist Gregory Ain in the International Style, this residence formed the backdrop to gay rights activist Harry Hay's early efforts with the Mattachine Society.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Prospect Studios / The Advocate

This Silver Lake film studio once housed production for "The Advocate," the longest-running LGBTQ-oriented publication in the country.
The Black Cat, 2013. Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

The Black Cat

The site of a 1966 police raid, The Black Cat represents the early evolution of the LGBTQ civil rights movement.

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