Explore LGBTQ Los Angeles | Los Angeles Conservancy
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Use this map to explore historic places important to our LGBTQ heritage.

Please note: Although some places on this map have been advocacy issues for the Conservancy, there is no direct correlation between the map and our advocacy activities. 

Just because a place is, or isn't, on this map does not mean that it will, or won't, be an advocacy issue for the Conservancy at some point. 

Similarly, this map represents a cross-section of LGBTQ historic places in Los Angeles County and is not an exhaustive list of places that are important in the history of the LGBTQ community. As more information is uncovered, new content will be added over time. Do you know of a place that should be included? Let us know!

To start exploring, click anywhere on the map or use the search and filter fields right below it. Your results will appear below this text.

Or, browse through the buildings listed below, in no particular order.

Circus Disco, 2015. Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy.

Circus Disco (Demolished)

From 1975 to 2016, Circus Disco was a significant social and cultural anchor for LGBTQ Latinxs in Los Angeles.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine / L.A. Conservancy

The Factory

The 1929 Factory building embodies a number of significant historical patterns in West Hollywood, from the development of the entertainment industry to the rise of nightlife visibly catering to the gay community.
Photo courtesy Calvin Fleming on Flickr

MacArthur Park

This park near downtown went from a mudhole, to a tony recreation spot, to a vibrant place of music, art, and community.
Postcard collection of Los Angeles Conservancy

Griffith Park

Griffith Park is the heart and soul of Los Angeles and in 2009 was designated as an Historic-Cultural Monument (HCM) to recognize its significance and ensure its long-term preservation.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Barlow Respiratory Hospital

A twenty-five acre hillside campus with thirty-two separate historic buildings dating from 1902 to 1952, mostly in the Craftsman and Spanish Colonial Revival styles.

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