In National Historic District | Los Angeles Conservancy

In National Historic District

Los Angeles Conservancy archives

El Capitan Theatre and Office Building

The El Capitan Theatre and Office Building is the third of four major theatres constructed by prominent real estate developer C. E. Toberman, known as the “Father of Hollywood.” The six-story building was designed in the elaborate Spanish Baroque style by the renowned firm of Morgan, Walls, & Clements, who incorporated retail and office space into the upper floors. Noted theatre architect G. Albert Lansburgh designed the elaborate interior.
Photo by Annie Laskey/Los Angeles Conservancy

Foy House

This Italianate-style residence is one of the few remaining homes in Los Angeles from the 1870s. An early resident was Mary Foy, L.A.'s first female chief librarian and a leader in the women's suffrage movement
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Globe Theatre/Garland Building

Built as a combination office tower and theatre venue, the 1913 Beaux Arts-style Garland Building was designed by Morgan, Walls & Morgan. Built for full-scale live theatre productions, the interior was designed by Alfred F. Rosenheim.
Grand Central Market
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Grand Central Market

In continuous operation as a market since 1917 out of two adjacent buildings built in 1897 and 1905, one of which was the first reinforced concrete building erected in Southern California.
Haskins House
Photo by Larry Underhill

Haskins House

The last Victorian built on Carroll Avenue and one of the few "Gay Nineties" houses remaining in Los Angeles, this quintessential Queen Anne vividly illustrates the height of late Victorian exuberance,
Heim House
Photo from Conservancy archives

Heim House

One of the original Victorian-era homes built during the initial development of the Angelino Heights neighborhood, it is one of three easements held by the Conservancy on Carroll Avenue.
Holly Hill Terrace Residence 
Photo by Flora Chou/L.A. Conservancy

Holly Hill Terrace Residence 

Located in one of Hollywood's most historic residential neighborhoods, plans for the development included height restrictions to guarantee that every home retained a view of the city below.

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