The Bryson | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Hunter Kerhart

The Bryson

The Bryson opened in January 1913 as the newest thing in elegant Los Angeles apartment living.

The Los Angeles Times proclaimed the Bryson by far the largest and finest apartment house on the Pacific Coast and on one of the most sightly corners in the fashionable Wilshire-Westlake district.

The Bryson's ninety-six apartments featured mahogany woodwork, tile floors in the bath and kitchen, and a built-in cedar chest in each dressing room. Living rooms doubled as bedrooms, with hideaway wall beds in each unit.

Amenities even included china and silver service for six, champagne glasses, and finger bowls. On the top floor was a ballroom and glass-enclosed loggias that on clear days offered a view of distant Catalina Island.

Actor Fred MacMurray owned the Bryson for many years, and the building has appeared in numerous films. A placard at the locked entry gate refers interested location scouts to the building's Hollywood agent.

Since an award-winning restoration by the Los Angeles Housing Partnership in 2001, the Bryson has served as low-income housing.

Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Margaret and Harry Hay Residence

Designed by modernist Gregory Ain in the International Style, this residence formed the backdrop to gay rights activist Harry Hay's early efforts with the Mattachine Society.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Roosevelt High School

Located in Boyle Heights, Roosevelt High School played a key role in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.