City of West Hollywood Fire Station #8 | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

City of West Hollywood Fire Station #8

Fire stations are a ubiquitous building type, so much so that they nearly disappear into the landscape unless a firetruck is coming out of one with lights and siren blasting. It's a shame, because so many of the fire stations in Los Angeles County are lovely examples of Mid-Century Modern design, representing a huge increase in construction to keep up with the postwar population explosion and housing boom.

Fire Station #8 on Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood is a perfect example. The building was completed in 1953 and has served in active operation ever since. The station is a simple three-story building with typical fire station necessities like double-height roll-up garage doors and space for both working and living, on-site.

It boasts a clean Mid-Century Modern design clad in smooth stucco and roman brick, flush window bays that wrap around a corner, curved canopies over the garage and main entrance, and geometric punch-outs in the canopy over the third-floor balcony.

Despite its three-story height, the building is modest in scale and has a strong horizontal feel so it melds very well with the low-scale streetscape around it. Fire Station #8 stands at the ready, another sometimes unnoticed but truly beautiful part of daily life.

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

LAFD Fire Engine Company No. 30

The first of two all-black fire stations in Los Angeles, Fire Company No. 30 played a key role in securing workplace equality for African American firefighters.
Target
Photo by Tom Davies

Robinson’s/Target

Designed for the affluent postwar Pasadena shopper, this former Robinson's was planned and sited to include prime viewing spots for the Rose Parade.