Office Building | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Office Building

Ventura Boulevard has an abundance of eye-catching architecture—so much, in fact, that some of its less flashy commercial buildings seem to fade into the background.

One example that deserves a second look is the fine Mid-Century Modern office building at 17100 Ventura in Encino. Completed in 1953, this two-story building was designed by Howard R. Lane and E. Ray Schlick, architects who practiced together in Encino until the early 1960s. The original occupant is unknown; it may have been the architectural firm itself, which is known to have moved to a new office at 15840 Ventura in 1962.

The building at 17100 Ventura features a dramatic open lobby with interior entrances and a staircase leading to the offices within. It is three stories in height and is angled toward the street in dynamic fashion.

The lobby's front is completely glassed in, with a framework of narrow post-and-beam-like elements highlighting both its verticality and its transparency. The same series of vertical lines is echoed in the two-story main building volume next to the tall lobby, which is otherwise horizontally oriented. The main volume features a classic flat roof and a simple front façade with a horizontal band of windows between matching horizontal bands of opaque black panels. This office building is a lovely example of Mid-Century Modern architecture in a low-rise, commercial context.

Zenith Tower
Photo by Devri Richmond

Zenith Tower

A distinctive Late Modern building that deserves a second look, Zenith Tower's architect, Maxwell Starkman, was one of the first combination architect-developers which put methods of production on equal footing with pure design.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Boat Houses

These miniscule (by today's standards) homes are clad in warm wood with angled ceilings, built-in furniture and glass facades giving Harry Gesner's "boat houses" their name.
Photo by Michael Locke

Cinerama Dome

Of all the vintage theatres in L.A., none stand out quite like the Cinerama Dome, a very rare example of an intact Cinerama theatre and the first concrete geodesic dome in the world.