Theatre | Los Angeles Conservancy

Theatre

Photo by Don Holtz

Old Town Music Hall

The State Theatre, originally opened in 1921 as a live performance venue for employees of the nearby Standard Oil Refinery, transformed into the Old Town Music Hall in 1968. Home to a Mighty Wurlitzer theatre organ, the theatre specializes in concerts, films from Hollywood’s Golden Age, and silent films accompanied live on the pipe organ.
Photo from Conservancy Archives

Pacific Theatre (Demolished)

This stunning Art Deco theatre was touted as the "civic pride of Beverly Hills."
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/Los Angeles Conservancy

Palace Theatre

The Palace opened in 1911 as the third home of the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest theatres in Los Angeles and the oldest remaining original Orpheum theatre in the U.S.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Pantages Theatre

The 1930 Pantages Theatre can hold claim to two “lasts”: the last movie palace to be built in Hollywood and the last venue erected by vaudeville circuit owner, Alexander Pantages. Designed by B. Marcus Priteca at the epitome of the Art Deco era, from sidewalk to stage, the Pantages dazzles theater-goers with chevrons, zigzags, starbrusts, and exotic figures.
Photo by Juan Kenobi

Pasadena Playhouse

Opened in 1925, the Pasadena Community Playhouse was designed by Elmer Grey and built by the Winter Construction Co. As the new home of the Pasadena Community Theatre, the Playhouse quickly became a hub of the theatre community west of the Mississippi River.
Photo by Sean_Yoda_Rouse on Flickr

Regent Theatre

The Regent is one of only two survivors of Main Street’s early entertainment heritage.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Rialto Theatre

Quinn's Rialto Theatre opened on May 21, 1917. The Rialto was one of the first theatres to have stadium style seating and features the longest neon marquee in the Broadway National Register Historic Theatre District.

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