Preservation Award Recipient | Los Angeles Conservancy

Preservation Award Recipient

Photo by Jessica Burns/L.A. Conservancy

Comerica Bank

Constructed by an unknown architect at South Pasadena's most prominent commercial intersection, the building was significantly altered when it was converted to a furniture store in the 1950s.
Downtown Women’s Center
Photo by Randall Michelson, Courtesy Pica + Sullivan Architects, Ltd.

Downtown Women’s Center

After years of languishing, what William Douglas Lee had designed for a shoe company gained new life as the Downtown Women's Center, earning a Conservancy Preservation Award.
Photo courtesy Thomas Safran & Associates and Coalition for Responsible Community Development

Dunbar Hotel

A beloved landmark of L.A.'s African American heritage has reclaimed its rightful place as a vibrant community resource.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Eastern Columbia Lofts

From its spectacular clock tower emblazoned with the name Eastern in neon down to its multi-colored terrazzo sidewalks, this 1930 downtown landmark was one of the largest buildings constructed in downtown until after WWII.
Los Angeles Conservancy archives

El Capitan Theatre and Office Building

The El Capitan Theatre and Office Building is the third of four major theatres constructed by prominent real estate developer C. E. Toberman, known as the “Father of Hollywood.” The six-story building was designed in the elaborate Spanish Baroque style by the renowned firm of Morgan, Walls, & Clements, who incorporated retail and office space into the upper floors. Noted theatre architect G. Albert Lansburgh designed the elaborate interior.
Ennis House
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Ennis House

The last and largest of Frank Lloyd Wright’s four “textile block” houses was designed by the father and built by the famed architect's son Lloyd.

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