28th Street Apartments | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Eric Staudenmaier Photography

28th Street Apartments

This building designed by Paul Revere Williams, the first African American member of the American Institute of Architects, originally served the African American community as a YMCA. Throughout the twentieth century it was the site of important political meetings and social gatherings.

The building featured two community rooms, a gymnasium, a pool, a communal cafeteria, and fifty-two dormitory-style rooms with shared toilets on each floor. The pool was an important feature, as municipal swimming pools were racially segregated in Los Angeles until 1931, providing African Americans with few swimming options.

In 2012, the historic YMCA reopened as 28th Street Apartments after a renovation project that converted the original building and a new addition into forty-nine studio apartments with private kitchens and baths. The building now serves low-income adults and formerly homeless youths transitioning to independent living. The project preserved a cultural and architectural icon in Los Angeles, earning it a Conservancy Preservation Award in 2013. 

Photo from Conservancy archives

Petitfils-Boos Residence 

Designed by Charles F. Plummer for restaurateur Walter Petitfils, this two-story, 9,000-square-foot house clad in buff-colored glazed terra cotta is an excellent example of the Italian Renaissance Revival style.
Photo by Juan Kenobi

Pasadena Playhouse

Opened in 1925, the Pasadena Community Playhouse was designed by Elmer Grey and built by the Winter Construction Co. As the new home of the Pasadena Community Theatre, the Playhouse quickly became a hub of the theatre community west of the Mississippi River.