Alex Theatre | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by VPISteve on Flickr

Alex Theatre

The Alex Theatre is Glendale's premier theatre and performance venue. It has been a hub of artistic and economic activity for downtown Glendale since its opening in 1925.

The Alexander was named for the son of its owner, C. L. Langley, who owned West Coast Theatres. The company later became Fox West Coast Theatres, the dominant theatre chain across Southern California from the late 1920s through the 1950s. The Alexander Theatre was a favorite of the studios for showing sneak previews of their major releases.

Although originally designed by architects Lindley & Selkirk in a Classical Revival style with an entry forecourt, in 1940, the theatre façade was remodeled into a spectacular Moderne edifice by noted theatre architect S. Charles Lee, and was renamed the Alex. Under Lee’s remodeling, a larger, detached box office, large tower, and large horizontal, trapezoidal marquee were created; these remain today, dominating much of Brand Boulevard and Glendale’s downtown.

The theatre interior originally seated 2,030 and features a lovely decorated proscenium, ceiling, and walls. Its original décor remains largely intact, although after a 1993 rehabilitation project, the overall seating capacity was reduced to 1,400. 

Currently, the theatre is a busy performing arts center featuring live performance and film screenings, including classic Hollywood motion pictures screened by the nonprofit Alex Film Society.

Photo by Sean_Yoda_Rouse on Flickr

Regent Theatre

The Regent is one of only two survivors of Main Street’s early entertainment heritage.
Photo by Don Holtz

Old Town Music Hall

The State Theatre, originally opened in 1921 as a live performance venue for employees of the nearby Standard Oil Refinery, transformed into the Old Town Music Hall in 1968. Home to a Mighty Wurlitzer theatre organ, the theatre specializes in concerts, films from Hollywood’s Golden Age, and silent films accompanied live on the pipe organ.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Cameo Theatre

Opening in 1910 as Clune's Broadway Theatre to screen first-run films, the 900-seat theatre was one of the country’s first theatres built to show movies. The modest Neo-classical design was considered quite elegant for a movie theatre at the time.