Altadena Public Library | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Altadena Public Library

Nestled in a lush green landscape of tall deodar cedars, tropical species, and native plants, the low-lying Altadena Public Library seems to open on all sides into its habitat. It was designed by Altadena architect Boyd Georgi in a Mid-Century Modern style that worked in close harmony with the landscape design by Eriksson Peters and Thoms.

The landscape incorporates mature trees that were planted in the 1880s, when the site was part of the estate of Colonel George G. Green. Completed in 1967, the building is composed of horizontal planes of concrete and long, open stretches of dark glass walls, punctuated by gray concrete blocks and simple vertical supports. A wooden bridge with metal railings lined with cheerful globe lights leads to the main entrance, which displays a dramatic metal wall sculpture by local artist David Green.

The interior is planned around a central reading area with a sunken floor, vaulted skylight, and more plants (including a mature palm tree), further blurring the separation between indoors and outdoors.

To complete the union of garden and structure, clerestory windows run the full perimeter of the building, pulling sunshine indoors and lending the central reading area the softly dappled light of a forest at midday.

Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist, 2018. M. Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy
Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist, 2018. Photo by M. Rosalind Sagara/L.A. Conservancy

Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist

The Sakai-Kozawa Residence/Tokio Florist and Pole Sign is Historic-Cultural Monument #1198. The property is significant for its association with the Sakai-Kozawa family and their longtime floral business, Tokio Florist, which operated at this location from 1960 to 2006.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

University Elementary School

With the school's philosophy of "learning by doing" in mind, the two sections of the campus sit on either side of a ravine, leaving the natural space undisturbed for use as a learning environment.
Lingenbrink Shops
Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Lingenbrink Shops

Its modern bones still apparent under new signage and canopies, this small shopping complex prefigured the now-common typology of the strip mall.