Aon Center | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Larry Underhill

Aon Center

When this sixty-two-story tower opened in 1973 as United California Bank, it soared above downtown as the tallest skyscraper west of the Mississippi River. It now ranks third in the city after the Wilshire Grand Center (2017) and the U.S. Bank Tower (1989). 

Dismissed decades ago as a nondescript vertical shaft by critics David Gebhard and Robert Winter, the Charles Luckman-designed building has come into its own as one of L.A.'s most recognizable skyscrapers.

Catastrophe was averted on May 4, 1988 when a fire broke out at night on the twelfth floor of what was known then as the First Interstate Bank tower.

While live television beamed frightening pictures of flames climbing toward workers trapped on upper floors, firefighters braced for the possibility of losing the entire building. Though one person perished, the firefighters managed to contain the damage to five floors, saving many other lives.

Photo by DAIQ

Rose Bowl

The beloved stadium’s creative and sensitive rehabilitation proves the viability of historic sports venues, an increasingly endangered species.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Santa Fe Springs Civic Center

Renowned architect and planner William L. Pereira designed the civic heart Santa Fe Springs, creating a grouping of one-story concrete block buildings carefully sited in a landscape that harmoniously combines alleés of trees, lush plantings, and paved plazas and walkways.
Kresge Chapel, Claremont School of Theology
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Kresge Chapel, Claremont School of Theology

In 1957, the Claremont School established a lovely New Formalist campus, its master plan designed by Edward Durell Stone, who also designed the best-known building on campus: Kresge Chapel.