Aon Center | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Larry Underhill

Aon Center

When this sixty-two-story tower opened in 1973 as United California Bank, it soared above downtown as the tallest skyscraper west of the Mississippi River. It now ranks second in the city to the U.S. Bank Tower (former Library Tower). It remains the tallest feature on the Wilshire skyline.

Dismissed decades ago as a nondescript vertical shaft by critics David Gebhard and Robert Winter, the Charles Luckman-designed building has come into its own as one of L.A.'s most recognizable skyscrapers.

Catastrophe was averted on May 4, 1988 when a fire broke out at night on the twelfth floor of what was known then as the First Interstate Bank tower.

While live television beamed frightening pictures of flames climbing toward workers trapped on upper floors, firefighters braced for the possibility of losing the entire building. Though one person perished, the firefighters managed to contain the damage to five floors, saving many other lives.

Courtesy Kilroy Realty

CBS Columbia Square

A Hollywood entertainment icon received a much-needed rehabilitation and upgrade, exemplifying how historic sites can return to their former glory while meeting current needs.
California Institute of the Arts
Photo by Scott Groller, copyright CalArts 2006

California Institute of the Arts

A Late Modern-style complex designed to facilitate open communication between all forms of creative arts, nestled into a landscape of rolling hills and mature eucalyptus trees.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Carling House

Designed for film composer Foster Carling, who wanted an open plan to accommodate his grand piano, the home's design played a key role in developing architect John Lautner's extraordinary ideas and methods.