Aon Center | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Larry Underhill

Aon Center

When this sixty-two-story tower opened in 1973 as United California Bank, it soared above downtown as the tallest skyscraper west of the Mississippi River. It now ranks second in the city to the U.S. Bank Tower (former Library Tower). It remains the tallest feature on the Wilshire skyline.

Dismissed decades ago as a nondescript vertical shaft by critics David Gebhard and Robert Winter, the Charles Luckman-designed building has come into its own as one of L.A.'s most recognizable skyscrapers.

Catastrophe was averted on May 4, 1988 when a fire broke out at night on the twelfth floor of what was known then as the First Interstate Bank tower.

While live television beamed frightening pictures of flames climbing toward workers trapped on upper floors, firefighters braced for the possibility of losing the entire building. Though one person perished, the firefighters managed to contain the damage to five floors, saving many other lives.

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Jewel's Catch One

For over forty years, Jewel's Catch One was a critical social anchor for the black LGBTQ community.
Photo by Regina O'Brien

Case Study House #10

Case Study House #10 exemplified the Case Study House program goals through the use of new building materials and techniques, affordability for the average American, simplicity of construction, economy of materials, and integration of indoor and outdoor living.