Arcade Theatre | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy

Arcade Theatre

The Pantages Theatre on Broadway was the first in Los Angeles leased to the Pantages Vaudeville Circuit, and its location helped secure Broadway as the city’s prime theatre district.

Opening in 1910, and originally seating 1,400 (later remodeled to seat 850), the theatre hosted opening night performers including Sophie Tucker, appearing on her first West Coast tour. Stan Laurel (of Laurel and Hardy) performed here in 1919. In 1925, the Pantages was sold to the Dalton Brothers, who also owned and operated a burlesque theater on Main Street.

The name was changed to the Arcade in 1928, as it was adjacent to the well-known Broadway-Spring Arcade Building. Dalton made changes to the foyer including adding a dome and murals, which were partially lost when, in 1938, theatre designer S. Charles Lee updated the foyer to the then-current Moderne style. Still, major portions of the original theatre’s interior remain intact, including its double proscenium arch.

The theatre eventually closed its doors, and the lobby area was converted to retail use in 1993.

Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Merced Theatre

Known for its masked balls at the turn of the twentieth century, the Merced Theatre is one of the oldest remaining LGBTQ spaces in Los Angeles.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Barlow Respiratory Hospital

A twenty-five acre hillside campus with thirty-two separate historic buildings dating from 1902 to 1952, mostly in the Craftsman and Spanish Colonial Revival styles.
Metro 417
Photo by Floyd Bariscale

Metro 417

Designed in the Beaux Arts style with Italian Renaissance ornamentation, this 1926 building has dual entrances, one to the offices above, and one to a concourse that served the city's early subway.