Arcade Theatre | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy

Arcade Theatre

The Pantages Theatre on Broadway was the first in Los Angeles leased to the Pantages Vaudeville Circuit, and its location helped secure Broadway as the city’s prime theatre district.

Opening in 1910, and originally seating 1,400 (later remodeled to seat 850), the theatre hosted opening night performers including Sophie Tucker, appearing on her first West Coast tour. Stan Laurel (of Laurel and Hardy) performed here in 1919. In 1925, the Pantages was sold to the Dalton Brothers, who also owned and operated a burlesque theater on Main Street.

The name was changed to the Arcade in 1928, as it was adjacent to the well-known Broadway-Spring Arcade Building. Dalton made changes to the foyer including adding a dome and murals, which were partially lost when, in 1938, theatre designer S. Charles Lee updated the foyer to the then-current Moderne style. Still, major portions of the original theatre’s interior remain intact, including its double proscenium arch.

The theatre eventually closed its doors, and the lobby area was converted to retail use in 1993.

Los Angeles Conservancy archives

El Capitan Theatre and Office Building

The El Capitan Theatre and Office Building is the third of four major theatres constructed by prominent real estate developer C. E. Toberman, known as the “Father of Hollywood.” The six-story building was designed in the elaborate Spanish Baroque style by the renowned firm of Morgan, Walls, & Clements, who incorporated retail and office space into the upper floors. Noted theatre architect G. Albert Lansburgh designed the elaborate interior.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

LAFD Fire Engine Company No. 30

The first of two all-black fire stations in Los Angeles, Fire Company No. 30 played a key role in securing workplace equality for African American firefighters.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

The Town House

The site of Elizabeth Taylor's first marriage celebration eventually became a preservation issue for the Conservancy.