Beverly Theatre (Demolished) | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Larry Underhill

Beverly Theatre (Demolished)

The Beverly Theatre was the first of six cinemas built in Beverly Hills, a true showplace for the work of the entertainment elite who lived in the neighborhood. It offered vaudeville as well as films, and its opening night program included a home movie "tour" of nearby homes of the stars.

Architect L. A. Smith clearly abided by the adage, attributed to theater architect S. Charles Lee, that "the show starts on the sidewalk." The Beverly Theatre's exotic, eclectic design blended near and far eastern motifs, topped by an onion dome. The opulent interior decor included murals based on the Arabian Nights, and a proscenium arch in the circular shape of a Chinese moon gate.

Although the theatre's facade changed over the decades, its iconic dome remained. The building closed as a movie house in 1977, and it was converted to commercial space, occupied by a Fiorucci boutique and an Israeli bank.

After heated battles with preservation groups, small businesses, and others in the area, the City of Beverly Hills granted permission in 2004 for developers to raze the Beverly Theatre for a luxury hotel complex. It was demolished in fall 2005.

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/Los Angeles Conservancy

Palace Theatre

The Palace opened in 1911 as the third home of the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest theatres in Los Angeles and the oldest remaining original Orpheum theatre in the U.S.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Roosevelt High School

Located in Boyle Heights, Roosevelt High School played a key role in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.
Photo by Laura Dominguez/L.A. Conservancy

Crossroads of the World

Completed in 1936, Crossroads of the World was one of the first outdoor shopping centers in the country.