Globe Theatre/Garland Building | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Globe Theatre/Garland Building

In 1913, during a time when most theatres on Broadway were being built as venues for vaudeville acts, theatrical producer Oliver Morosco opened the Morosco Theatre. His theatre was unusual in that it accommodated full-scale dramatic productions.

The noted architecture firm Morgan, Walls & Morgan, designed the building, including the office tower, while the interior of the theatre was the work of Alfred F. Rosenheim. The Beaux Art style building is eleven stories tall with a façade of glazed brick and terra cotta ornamentation.

The current marquee dates back to the 1940s when the theatre began showing newsreels and its name was changed to “The Globe.” However, the word “Morosco” can still be spotted behind the marquee. The original marble staircase and plaster decorations of cherubs, garland, and theatrical masks can still be viewed inside the theatre.

The theatre later showed Spanish-language films until it closed in the 1980s. In 1987, the theatre floor was leveled. For many years, the lobby was used as retail space and the auditorium was used as a nightclub. It was recently renovated and reopened as a nightclub and live entertainment venue.

Photo from Conservancy archives

Banco Popular de Puerto Rico

Built in 1903 and the largest individual investment for an office building in Los Angeles at the time, the building was acquired and renovated in 1976 making it the first major step in revitalizing Spring Street.
Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Liberation House

The original Liberation House in Hollywood represented a response to the increasing numbers of LGBTQ individuals living on the streets in the 1970s.
Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy

Brockman Building and Annex

The opulence of the original façade, which features elaborate terra cotta detailing and a copper cornice, was the only one in the city at the time of its construction.