Inglewood Civic Center | Los Angeles Conservancy
Inglewood Civic Center
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Inglewood Civic Center

Inglewood's twenty-nine-acre Civic Center contains its City Hall, main library, a fire station, a police facility, a parking garage, and a public health complex in a square bounded by La Brea Avenue, Florence Avenue, Manchester Boulevard, and Fir Avenue. Completed in 1973, the Civic Center was designed by Charles Luckman Associates to revitalize Inglewood's civic and business district. Its plan aimed to increase mobility in the area for both pedestrians and cars, and create landscaped open space in the heart of the city.

The complex's most impressive buildings are its eight-story City Hall, standing atop a wide, two-story base, and its four-level library building, which is supported on tall columns. Both are Brutalist in style, with their monumental concrete bulks serving as both structure and ornamentation. The library includes an interesting mural-in-concrete called The Written Word, created by sculptor Tom Van Sant and looking like modern rock art images rising up a tall column.

All of the buildings are tied together by a landscape designed by landscape architect Robert Herrick Carter. It features expansive green spaces and multiple pedestrian malls and bridges, including elevated walkways that help facilitate foot traffic. Inglewood's Civic Center is a successful rethinking of the city's governmental core, combining a verdant landscape with monumental concrete buildings to create a flowing and vibrant urban center.

Glendale Municipal Services Building
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Glendale Municipal Services Building

Lifted up on its graceful pilotis, the futuristic Municipal Services Building must have generated many passing glances from Glendale motorists when it opened almost forty years ago—and it remains a head-turner today.
Bank of America Chinatown Branch, 2020. Photo by Jenna Snow.

Bank of America Chinatown Branch

Designed by Gilbert Leong and Richard Layne Tom in the 1970s, the Chinatown Branch of Bank of America is significant for its architecture and connection to L.A.'s growing Chinese American community. The property is being considered for Historic-Cultural Monument listing.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Using the rolling topography and mild outdoor climate as his palette, the architect masterfully integrated broad landscapes of green lawns and concrete walkways, punctuated by an abundance of trees.