Bank of America Plaza | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Bank of America Plaza

One of the first high-rises on Bunker Hill, the former Security Pacific Building stands alone on the western edge of the hill. The monumental quality of the stone-and-glass tower is reinforced by its solitude; by the low, park-like landscaping surrounding it; and by the siting of the building at a forty-five-degree angle to the street.

The effect is reminiscent of Le Corbusier’s 1924 influential concept of the modern office building as a “tower in the park.”

The building’s interior features a particularly spacious lobby that surrounds the central elevator bank. Walls of glass look out to the garden and fountains, seeming to bring the outdoors in and providing an interesting counterpoint to the monolithic exterior. On the plaza in front of the building stands “Four Arches,” a large orange metal sculpture by the famed artist Alexander Calder. One of the most impressive pieces of public art in Los Angeles, this piece was commissioned as part of the Redevelopment Agency’s public art program.

Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Century Plaza Towers

Yamasaki's design for the Corporate International-style towers reflects his belief that buildings should use the smallest possible amount of materials to attain the greatest possible stability, function, and aesthetic appeal.
Student Walkouts at Garfield High School. Photo by LAPL.

Garfield High School

The century-old Garfield High School played a key role in the East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts (Blowouts) of March 1968.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Security Pacific National Bank

The Security Pacific National Bank building by Jim Tyler of Craig Elwood Associates embodies the Corporate International style with a reinforced concrete frame clad in bronze anodized aluminum and curtain walls of bronze-tinted glass.