Brockman Building and Annex | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy

Brockman Building and Annex

The Brockman Building is a twelve-story Beaux Arts building noted for its early use of multi-colored terra cotta, as well as its pioneering role in establishing West Seventh Street as downtown Los Angeles’ premier shopping destination. Designed by Barnett, Haynes, and Barnett, the building features elaborate terra cotta detailing and a copper cornice – the only one in the city at the time of its construction. The façade of the adjacent four-story annex, designed by Dodd & Richards and completed in 1917, is clad in complimentary terra cotta.

The building's original owner, developer John C. Brockman, hoped that this building at the intersection of Seventh Street and Grand Avenue would be the anchor in his plans to extend the downtown commercial district westward. The building housed a variety of upscale clothiers throughout the years, including longtime retail tenant Brooks Brothers, who occupied the ground floor of the building from 1965 to 1989.

The Brockman building played a pioneering role in establishing West Seventh Street as downtown Los Angeles’ premier shopping destination.

 

Photo by Jessica Hodgdon/L.A. Conservancy

Ralphs Market

The front façade of this market building by R. Leon Edgar features a combined roof and walls of smooth concrete, bending up from the ground to flatten out and shelter the building.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Southwest Marine (Bethlehem Steel Corp.; Southwestern Shipbuilding)

Southwest Marine is the last remaining example of the once highly significant shipbuilding industry at the Port of Los Angeles, remarkably intact and dating to World War II, with sixteen buildings and structures considered contributing elements of a National Register-eligible historic district.
Photo by Jessica Burns/L.A. Conservancy

Comerica Bank

Constructed by an unknown architect at South Pasadena's most prominent commercial intersection, the building was significantly altered when it was converted to a furniture store in the 1950s.