Brockman Building and Annex | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Lauren Everett/L.A. Conservancy

Brockman Building and Annex

The Brockman Building is a twelve-story Beaux Arts building noted for its early use of multi-colored terra cotta, as well as its pioneering role in establishing West Seventh Street as downtown Los Angeles’ premier shopping destination. Designed by Barnett, Haynes, and Barnett, the building features elaborate terra cotta detailing and a copper cornice – the only one in the city at the time of its construction. The façade of the adjacent four-story annex, designed by Dodd & Richards and completed in 1917, is clad in complimentary terra cotta.

The building's original owner, developer John C. Brockman, hoped that this building at the intersection of Seventh Street and Grand Avenue would be the anchor in his plans to extend the downtown commercial district westward. The building housed a variety of upscale clothiers throughout the years, including longtime retail tenant Brooks Brothers, who occupied the ground floor of the building from 1965 to 1989.

The Brockman building played a pioneering role in establishing West Seventh Street as downtown Los Angeles’ premier shopping destination.

 

Photo courtesy Sally Egan

Claremont Packing House

College Heights Lemon Packing House is the only remaining packing house built in Claremont during the height of the citrus industry.
Rancho Los Amigos and power plant structure. Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Rancho Los Amigos

The former County Poor Farm, now abandoned, provides a rare glimpse into the early history of Los Angeles.