Charlotte and Robert Disney House | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Linda Dishman/L.A. Conservancy

Charlotte and Robert Disney House

This one-story craftsman bungalow is significant as the first home of Walt Disney in Los Angeles and the location of his first local animation work. The house was owned by Disney’s uncle Robert and Aunt Charlotte, and 21-year-old Walt relocated to Los Angeles in 1923 and began his animation work in the garage while boarding with them at this residence.

Walt achieved his first success with local animation work within months of his arrival to Los Angeles and the creation of his pioneering animation studio, which introduced numerous innovations to the industry. With a career spanning more than four decades, Walt Disney left an indelible impact on the entertainment industry and firmly cemented himself as an icon of twentieth century American culture.

While several properties in the Los Angeles region are associated with Walt Disney, his first permanent studio location on Hyperion Avenue was demolished in 1966 and the Kingswell Building where he rented studio space between 1923 and 1926 has been altered.

The house at 4406 Kingswell Avenue remains highly intact and features original windows, a wrap-around front porch, and a shingle-clad exterior with wide, overhanging eaves.  The interior retains original woodwork and a fireplace mantel featuring rough-hewn stone.

The property remained in the Disney family for 30 years. Its association with the Disneys is well documented, including family home movie footage depicting the family in the front yard.

Photo by Michael Smith on Flickr

Villa Riviera

With a clever composition featuring splayed wings that offer ocean views to most of its 130 units, this Chateauesque design remains one of the city's most recognizable landmarks.
Photo courtesy Heritage Housing Partners

Herkimer Arms

Built in 1912 as an eight-unit dwelling, the Herkimer Arms is the only surviving apartment building by master architects Charles and Henry Greene, and one of their few buildings with a gunite exterior.
Lucy E. Wheeler Residence
Photo by Marcello Vavala/L.A. Conservancy.

Lucy E. Wheeler Residence

The last remaining example of Charles and Henry Greene's work in the City of Los Angeles, meticulously restored by L.A. Conservancy co-founder Martin Eli Weil.