Farmers and Merchants Bank and Annexes | Los Angeles Conservancy
Farmers and Merchants Bank and Annexes
Photo from Conservancy archives

Farmers and Merchants Bank and Annexes

Designed in the Classical Revival style, the Farmers and Merchants Bank Building remains one of Southern California’s finest examples of the early "temples of finance" that were popular at the turn of the century. Its two-story façade, reminiscent of a Roman temple, is punctuated by an entrance framed with Corinthian pilasters topped by a large triangular pediment. Built in 1905, the bank was designed by the firm of Morgan and Walls.

The Farmers and Merchants Bank was the first incorporated bank in Los Angeles, founded in 1871 by Isaias W. Hellman, a successful merchant, real estate speculator, and banker, and brother of Hermann W. Hellman. Isaias was to remain president of the bank till his death in 1920. Much of the original 1905 banking room remains, including light fixtures, a central skylight, and the loggia with its intricate railings. Operating as a bank until its closure in the late 1980s, the building now functions primarily as a special events and banquet facility, and film location.

Photo by Flora Chou/L.A. Conservancy

National Bank of Whittier Building

Clad in glazed terra cotta with classically inspired detailing and leaded-glass transoms, this six-story building by father-and-son architects John and Donald B. Parkinson exemplifies the Beaux Arts style.
Pacific Electric Lofts
Photo by Richard Langendorf

Pacific Electric Lofts

Upon its completion in 1904, the Huntington Building was the largest office building in Los Angeles.
Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Cameo Theatre

Opening in 1910 as Clune's Broadway Theatre to screen first-run films, the 900-seat theatre was one of the country’s first theatres built to show movies. The modest Neo-classical design was considered quite elegant for a movie theatre at the time.