Libby House | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Marco Antonio Garcia

Libby House

One of the first homes constructed in Angelino Heights, this fine example of the Queen Anne style was built in 1887 for Caleb Libby, a retired entrepreneur, and his wife, Minerva.

The home displays the asymmetry, variety, and rounded shapes typical of the style. The exterior features distinctive details such as decorative porch columns, “fish-scale” shingles, and wood painted to resemble stone. The stained glass windows are original, as is the ironwork cresting atop the Mansard tower (many homes in the area retain their original cresting). The home has been restored inside and out, complete with period furnishings.

Behind the main house sits the original carriage house, now a separate residence. From the carriage house, it’s easy to see the close proximity of Angelino Heights to downtown Los Angeles.

Malin Residence (Chemosphere)
Photo by Nick Neyland on Flickr

Malin Residence (Chemosphere)

An octagon perched atop a twenty-nine-foot high, five-foot-wide concrete column like a flying saucer on a stick, the Chemosphere is recognizable even to those who know nothing else about mid-century architecture.
Image courtesy the National Trust for Historic Preservation

Church of the Epiphany

The Church of the Epiphany conveys numerous aspects of Lincoln Heights' history, from its Period Revival architecture to its connection to the Chicano Movement.
Photo by Marco Antonio Garcia

Phillips House

One of the most ornate homes in Angelino Heights, this 1887 house on a prominent corner lot feature extravagant decoration all sides.