Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery

When completed in 1946, the Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery was the most modern, state-of-the-art facility on Terminal Island. Pan-Pacific consists of two buildings, a processing plant and a warehouse, spanning the entire block bounded by Sardine, Barracuda, Bass, and Ways Streets.

Although the buildings suffer from deferred maintenance, they remain highly intact.  With its original interior layout and even much of the original equipment remaining, this site is a rare surviving example of a cannery that still conveys its initial purpose and operations. It tells the story of the transformation of raw fish from the wharf to canned product shipped out via truck or rail.

Pan-Pacific is a highly rare, intact site that exemplifies the postwar expansion of canneries in the Fish Harbor area of Terminal Island. 

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Canner's Steam Plant

The Canner’s Steam Plant was integral to the booming seafood canning industry at Terminal Island, generating steam from a single source which enhanced the canning process and helped increase efficiency throughout Fish Harbor.
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Sheats Apartments

Completed in 1949, the building was designed by master architect John Lautner as eight units of student housing. Asymmetrically arranged shapes, from circular volumes to long, flat planes, step up the hill and around each other to form a strangely harmonious, abstractly futuristic, and truly organic-feeling whole.