Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery

When completed in 1946, the Pan-Pacific Fisheries Cannery was the most modern, state-of-the-art facility on Terminal Island. Pan-Pacific consists of two buildings, a processing plant and a warehouse, spanning the entire block bounded by Sardine, Barracuda, Bass, and Ways Streets.

Although the buildings suffer from deferred maintenance, they remain highly intact.  With its original interior layout and even much of the original equipment remaining, this site is a rare surviving example of a cannery that still conveys its initial purpose and operations. It tells the story of the transformation of raw fish from the wharf to canned product shipped out via truck or rail.

Pan-Pacific is a highly rare, intact site that exemplifies the postwar expansion of canneries in the Fish Harbor area of Terminal Island. 

Photo by Douglas Hill

Albert Van Luit Complex

The site of the world-renowned wallpaper factory of Albert Van Luit, the Mid-Century Modern Van Luit Complex provided a safe and diverse work environment for ethnic and sexual minorities from the 1950s through 1970s.
Gerry Building
Photo courtesy Architectural Resources Group

Gerry Building

Continuously housing garment manufacturers and fashion showrooms since it was built and an early example of post-WWII Modernism, the Gerry Building stands as a functional, vibrant industrial space.
Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/L.A. Conservancy

Al Larson Boat Shop Complex

The Al Larson Boat Shop (ALBS) is among the longest-running businesses at the Port of Los Angeles, and one of the few remaining that relate to its rich tradition of shipbuilding and repair.