Roxie Theatre | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Michael Locke

Roxie Theatre

The Roxie Theatre was the last theatre built on Broadway. The Roxie, noted for its stepped roofline, tower, decorative chevrons, and highly stylized geometric forms, was the only theatre downtown built in the Art Deco architectural style.

The theatre originally seated 1600 guests, and the auditorium’s long, narrow configuration was designed to make use of amplified sound.

The Roxie was designed for film presentation, rather than stage shows. Yet the theatre was equipped with a small stage, fly space, and full rigging, making it one of the last film houses constructed in Los Angeles with a full working stage.

The elaborate, plaster proscenium is the most prominent interior highlight, while the sidewalk at the theatre’s entryway features a terrazzo sunburst – a popular design motif of the early Art Deco era. '

The lobby was converted to retail use in the late 1980s, which caused the removal of the theatre’s ticket booth. The auditorium, however, remains intact, but is disrepair due to water damage and disuse.

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/Los Angeles Conservancy

Palace Theatre

The Palace opened in 1911 as the third home of the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest theatres in Los Angeles and the oldest remaining original Orpheum theatre in the U.S.
Photo from L.A. Conservancy archives

Santa Anita Park

Santa Anita Park greatly contributed to the advancement of California's thoroughbred racing industry, though it would later become infamous as the site of the largest Assembly Center for Japanese American internment during World War II.