Southwest Museum | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Tom Davies

Southwest Museum

The historic Southwest Museum campus, perched on a hilltop along the Arroyo Seco, is an architectural treasure and icon of northeast Los Angeles.

The first museum in Los Angeles, the Southwest Museum of the American Indian was created in the early 1900s by Charles Fletcher Lummis, a central figure in the region’s early history.

Lummis is considered by many to be the father of historic preservation in Southern California, having founded the Landmarks Club in 1895 to promote restoration of the badly deteriorated eighteenth-century missions. The Southwest Museum was one of Lummis’ most significant projects, intended to make Southern California “one of the nation’s chief centers of culture.”

Designed by Sumner Hunt and Silas Burns in the Mission Revival style, the Southwest Museum building opened in 1914. It was home to one of the world’s finest collections of Native American artifacts and stood as a cultural focal point in northeast Los Angeles for more than seventy-five years. The museum building is a designated Historic-Cultural Monument and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Photo by Adrian Scott Fine/Los Angeles Conservancy

Palace Theatre

The Palace opened in 1911 as the third home of the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest theatres in Los Angeles and the oldest remaining original Orpheum theatre in the U.S.
Hilton Checkers
Photo by Johnathan Clover, www.cloverleafimages.com

Hilton Checkers

Built on a lot only sixty feet wide and 160 feet deep, the Mayflower Hotel's exterior is Spanish in style while the interior leans more toward "Pilgrim Revival."