Chinese Theatre | Los Angeles Conservancy
Photo by Michelle Lee on Flickr

Chinese Theatre

The world-famous Chinese Theatre opened in 1927 with the premiere of Cecil B. DeMille’s King of Kings and immediately became an iconic fixture in Hollywood.

Developed by impresario Sid Grauman, whose earlier venues include the Million Dollar and Egyptian Theatres, Grauman’s Chinese Theatre has operated continuously as a first-run cinema and continues to play host to high-profile movie premieres. Designed by the architecture firm Meyer & Holler in a dramatic yet fanciful interpretation of Chinese architecture and art, the theatre features a pagoda-shaped roof rising to 90 feet, supported by massive columns topped by wrought iron masks.

Imported temple bells, pagodas, stone Heaven Dogs, and other artifacts from China are integrated into the theatre’s design. The theatre underwent a $7 million renovation in 2000-01 that upgraded amenities, uncovered long-obscured details, and restored the exterior to its original appearance. Now known as TCL Chinese Theatre, the building underwent another renovation in 2013 to provide first-run IMAX capabilities.

Photo by Annie Laskey/L.A. Conservancy

Globe Theatre/Garland Building

Built as a combination office tower and theatre venue, the 1913 Beaux Arts-style Garland Building was designed by Morgan, Walls & Morgan. Built for full-scale live theatre productions, the interior was designed by Alfred F. Rosenheim.
Photo by Flora Chou/L.A. Conservancy

National Bank of Whittier Building

Clad in glazed terra cotta with classically inspired detailing and leaded-glass transoms, this six-story building by father-and-son architects John and Donald B. Parkinson exemplifies the Beaux Arts style.